Steven Erikson on life, and writing

I don’t usually quote long bits of text, but this is just too good to not share:

[I]’ve just finished Toll the Hounds, which is the eighth novel in the Malazan Book of the Fallen series. At the moment I am working on a co-written novella with Ian C. Esslemont set in the same world, and I confess I’ve started the prologue to the ninth in the series. As for Toll the Hounds, I guess I can say I’m pleased with the result; that’s a statement that needs qualification, however. The novel is about love and grief, and integral to that exploration was my fair share of both this past year, as my father fell ill and in the course of four months withered away and died. There is something mercenary in writers, something that others might view with faint disgust, and that is the terrible desire to feed off one’s own circumstances, using genuine emotions (including suffering) to infuse a fictional tale that is, at its core, meaningless. I don’t mean that as a disparagement of fiction; as writers we play a game of illusion, pretending to a reality that does not exist, and if we can, we use that false reality to generate real emotion. And that’s what can make a normal person understandably uneasy, as the writer guides that person into a very personal world; as, in this instance, I happen to be inviting him or her to share in my grief. Does all this stem from an overblown ego? I’m not sure; I feel pretty humble these days. At the same time there is an undeniable ego to the presumption of being writers: that we actually possess something worth saying, not to mention the conceit that words possess real efficacy (but those are topics for some other time). All that makes the novel sound like a downer, but while there are tragic elements to the tale, there are plenty of lighter ones, too. It’s more like a wake. You get laughs, you get tears, and maybe when it’s all said and done, you walk away thoughtful, standing in the afternoon light, saying goodbye to someone who is no longer there. As I did.

Here’s the whole interview.

That’s a huge chunk of text to digest at one go—so I suggest that people who haven’t read anything by him go over it a couple of times. You really don’t know what you’re missing if you haven’t read anything by Steven Erikson.

I’ll personally lend my copy of Gardens of the Moon to anybody who’s interested (and who’s in the neighbourhood).

PS: I can’t wait for Toll of Hounds to be out!